Deeded RV Lots: Should You Purchase an RV Lot?

Affiliate Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Finding a place to stay overnight with your RV that’s in an ideal location with a great view is hard. You want the RV park to have useful amenities and be close to stores or attractions too. The best resorts are usually booked up well ahead, especially spots with the best views, water access, or other notable positives. This is where a deeded RV lot is extremely useful to you.

Deeded RV lots are a great idea for people who enjoy staying in the same place and wish to guarantee their spot. They also represent another possibility for former active RVers who now find the road too challenging. These people are looking to acquire a park model to stay in or to go static with their RV. The RV resorts or RV parks with deeded RV lots typically include full hookups, potable water, waste collection, and other perks like a local restaurant or convenience store.

For people who have visited an RV park or upmarket resort staying for extended periods of a few weeks or several months – they never want to leave. Securing the same lot or one offering similar benefits isn’t always possible when renting. This is usually when some people begin to consider whether a deeded RV lot is for sale at the resort and if it represents a good deal for them.

Read Also: Is Buying an RV Lot a Good Investment?

What is a Deeded RV Lot?

A deeded RV lot is a plot of land usually within an existing RV park or RV resort that is being offered for sale by the owner. The owner might be the park or resort owner, or a private seller.

These lots come with their deeds (or a share of the deed for the park or resort as a whole) proving ownership.

While the lot may be a simple concrete slab or a green area, it may also have a separate covered structure to the side of where the RV will be parked. It depends entirely on what’s been developed out by the previous owner.

There are various fees with an RV lot including property taxes, utility bills, waste management, and housing association fees.

Read Also: How Big is One Acre of Land?

Who is Interested in Purchasing an RV Lot?

A deeded RV lot is possibly a good choice for people who enjoy the area and commonly vacation there almost every year.

Sometimes, people prefer the location because it has a desirable view, river, or ocean access for boating, or other reasons.

There is also a growing interest in acquiring RV lots for seniors who feel their traveling days are over, but they still enjoy living in their recreational vehicles. In which case, they may enjoy owning an RV lot as a form of a second home where they can be semi-permanently situated.

When long-distance driving is not preferable any longer, then flying down to Florida or another coastal location is still desirable for a vacation trip. Leaving an RV on the lot is perfectly safe in a well-maintained resort. When arriving, it doesn’t feel like an impersonal hotel room because it’s their second home.

Read Also: Driving a Motorhome After 70: The Golden Years?

RV Lot Pricing Varies Widely

There are many RV lots for sale scattered around certain states. Florida is one of the most popular places but there is plenty of interest elsewhere including in both coastal and further inland locations.

Price Depends on Location and Climate

When looking for an RV lot that’s on the edge of the waterline with a dock for a small boat, these command premium prices in the $100,000-200.000 range.


However, for less exotic options, RV lots can be picked up in the high five figures for decent resorts that are well kept.

Climate Controlled?

The climate also plays a major part in some regions and states.

Due to the heat of the summer or how cold it gets in the wintertime, some deeded RV lots are only usable at certain times of the year. This changes their inherent value.

Read Also: Will RV Antifreeze Thaw Frozen Pipes?

Amenities Add Up

High-end resorts charge a premium for their amenities. True, they usually offer more of them including extras like a swimming pool, café, restaurant, clubhouse, and other benefits. There might also be a gym, dog park, and game courts like ones for tennis or pickleball too.

Other RV parks may be simple campgrounds with basic communal bathrooms, free Wi-Fi in certain areas, and not much else.

Property Taxes and Fees

There are Property Owners Association (POA) or Homeowners Association (HOA) dues charged on a monthly, quarterly, or annual basis for most RV lots. These may cost from $40 up into the hundreds per month. Other fees may also apply.

Property taxes are not to be ignored either. Some lots may cost close to $1,000 just on annual property taxes alone.

Typically, it isn’t surprising to see the total costs of annual ownership run 3-4% of the original purchase price.

Read Also: Motorhome Tire Life Expectancy

Can the RV Be Left on the Lot?

It depends on the agreement with the RV resort or RV park for how long an RV or camper may be left unoccupied on a lot even when you own it.

Some agreements allow for an RV or camper to remain on-site all year round. Others have limitations for how many months they may be situated there or how long the RV must be off the lot annually.

To understand all the legal ins and outs of a purchasing agreement for an RV lot, it’s strongly advisable to hire a lawyer experienced in these types of real estate deals. There are many deal points to negotiate on and consider some of which will make the lot less attractive if the restrictions on the use are problematic.

For instance, some RV lot others like to leave it vacant part of the year and rent it out. This offsets the cost of maintenance but the HOA or POA will take a cut of any rental (the rental rate may also be fixed and outside their control). However, not all RV resorts permit renting a lot once it’s been purchased,. So, it’s important to be completely clear on all aspects of the purchase before deciding on it.

Do You Save Money Vs. Using an RV Resort?

Depending on how upscale the RV resort or park is, it’s easily possible for a nightly stay during the peak season to cost $60-$100. When wishing to stay for a month, that can become a costly bill of $1,800-$3,100. When staying more than a month and still maintaining a primary residence elsewhere, that expense becomes considerable.

When leaving an RV on the lot (with permission to do so), this saves on the gas and time used to drive to the resort location.

There are plenty of deeded RV lots available for approximately $100,000 or less in attractive, well-maintained resorts. The maintenance and property taxes might be estimated in the $2,000-$3,000 range per year.

Therefore, for purchasers, they may find a $95,000 lot which when all completed and the legal fees covered, may have cost upwards of $100,000 to acquire. However, when staying for several months each year, it becomes less expensive than renting. RV lot financing is also sometimes a possibility.

When staying 6-12 months a year in an RV on the lot, owning a deeded RV lot can be a huge money saver.  

Read Also: Why are RV Parks So Expensive?

Convenience, Customization, and Community

When keeping an RV on the lot and/or possibly building out a secondary shelter, it’s very convenient to go to the resort and chill out. It’s your own space – it’s familiar, comfortable, and relaxing.

It’s often possible to build on the lot, but this is subject to the set of covenants related to the deed. This may determine the possible size of any structures, how permanent they are, and the permitted building materials. Other aspects such as lighting, landscaping, and water management might also be part of the covenants too.

Another perk for more active people is that toys like 4x4s, Side-by-Sides, and other activities can be pursued without needing to transport the toys by road every summer season.

And let’s not forget the sense of community with other owners nearby. Also, it’s worth noting that some RV communities are tailored (or restricted) to certain age groups.

Read Also: Walmart RV parking

Can the RV Lot Be Sold Later?

Yes, it can.

It’s a specialty piece of real estate that has a residual value. Large lots are easier to sell than smaller ones. Pet-segregated ones command a higher price too.

It’s worth bearing in mind that like with any other real estate or land parcel, the listing is competing with any other lots for sale at that time.

Should another RV lot be in a more desirable or picturesque location or the resort offers better amenities, it may be difficult to sell quickly. If any neighbors can be seen or heard from your lot, that’s less attractive too. Also, unexpected problems with runoff water following heavy rainfall could factor into the level of interest generated.

Related Articles

How Big is One Acre of Land?

Camping and RVing: Which is the Right Choice?

15 RV Driving Tips for New RVers-Learn to Drive an RV

Driving a Motorhome After 70: The Golden Years?